I follow Dirty Lazy Keto: my way


#1

Dirty Lazy works well for me because I keep below 50gms carbs per day and once a month or so I allow myself to have a favourite pre keto meal like fish n chips. I hover around half to one pound heavier next day but I’ve been steadily losing and am down 20pounds painlessly. I haven’t kickstarted any cravings so I hope to get through comfort food season by indulging in my luxurious meat and fat, cheese, butter and low carb veg with occasional yummy treat. I’ve never been so mentally relaxed and ready to keep burning fat.
I also only record a drop in weight so that I fool my brain when I look at that lovely graph going down and down and down. On my PM’s or period times I skip weighing altogether as it demoralises me. So that’s my cheatin’ story and I’m sticking to it.


(Jane) #2

Whatever works for you is good! How old are you?


#3

I’m 52 and started Keto again end of July.


#4

This low stress hormone approach is commendable. It’s good to share it.

There is avalanche risk for some who might try to emulate it. Food avalanche risk, or psychologically destructive avalanche risk. Especially with those who strive for healthier lives but identify with food addictions. Or, those who may have an expectations to reality mismatch.

The importance of discussing this is to help understand the spectrum of ‘restriction’ that different people apply to many of the things that they do, including eating, especially after discovering that what they are/were doing was injuring theirself.

It helps explain the adamancy of some of the replies in some of the threads for approaches to dietary health that are less than strictly by ‘the rules’.

Eating is a moveable feast. Not eating, I guess, is a moveable fast.


(Old Baconian) #5

I would just counsel that it can be cruel to sugar/carb addicts to suggest that a bit of extra carbohydrate is not going to hurt them. I have seen a number of sober alcoholics get started on epic binges because someone convinced them that they could surely “have just one.” For an addict, total abstinence is actually easier.


#6

I find for myself the more restrictions I place on myself food wise, the less success I have. I have a five year old chocolate bar in a drawer somewhere that I tell myself that I can have if I absolutely must. I haven’t felt that desperation and the chocolate bar continues to live because I give myself permission to have it if I need it. A lame security blanket but it works for me. If I threw it away, I know I would think about it and crave it and then would buy 10 and eat them because it was forbidden. Not forbidden?, Not a problem. So for me, it’s largely my mind has to be in the game or nothing will work.


#7

I hope I’m not suggesting that Anyone follow what I do. I’m merely listing what works for me.

Please feel free to remove the posts if you think I’ve been cruel in anyway. I can go elsewhere. Bye.


#8

It’s nice to find the method that works best for us :slight_smile:
I know very well I should be just flexible enough, indulgent enough, strict enough and doing something very different sometimes… We are individuals and even our attitude and circumstances change. It’s simpler to stick to some woe with very fixed rules but it’s not the right way for everyone all their life. Just like allowing a carby day is dangerous for some people. It’s just pointless for others. There are various cases for sure.

I do it differently but I realized a single moderately carby day does nothing to me (nothing changes, not even my weight. I had water weight changes going on/off keto for years but it stopped. I guess my body realized it better keeps my glycogen storages filled even in ketosis?). I often read about such people just like there are many cases where even a bit more carbs cause problems.

50g carb limit doesn’t work for many either, it’s good it works for you :slight_smile: Are you sure you are in ketosis? Losing fat easily is possible without it, low-carb alone may be enough, it was for me until some point. Not like it’s necessarily important, I tend to say that I don’t even care about ketosis, I just want to feel great :wink: (And lose fat is possible but it’s hard for me.) It’s another thing I need extreme low-carb most of the time for that, ketosis isn’t enough…

Well, keep up the good work, you seem to do it right :slight_smile:


#9

Most days carbs are around 15-20 but I mentally “allow” myself up to 50. I certainly don’t try to get to 50, but if I get near it, I don’t get bent out of shape about and start hand wringing. :relaxed:. I also find that most days I only have my meat, butter and some cheese but other days I want my cauliflower and cheese mash, or steamed cabbage swimming in butter so I seem to be developing a pattern of meat/fat or veg/fat days. I rarely eat them together in one day.


#10

I understand now. Most of your items are so low-carb I wondered if you love your low-carb vegetables in bigger amounts as I did… And the tasty yumminess can be carby too.
You do a bit similarly than me then, I keep my carbs very low if possible but me, being me, have carbier days and I am very sure that I can go up to about 45g just not every day if I know what is good for me. So my good times are keto with varying carbs. It works better than trying to enforce a super low carb limit but I had to figure out how my body and mind works.

Interesting, people usually eat meat and vegetables together. I skipped that when I jumped from vegetarian keto to carnivore-ish (and even when I eat plants or don’t eat meat, my vegetable intake typically stays insignificant)… But I always base my meals on fatty protein.


#11

My lunch was 1 cup of mashed cauliflower with TSP butter and 2tbsp of cream cheese salt and pepper. Yum!!


(Stephanie ) #12

I also eat similar :blush: I Try to stay under 20 and once or twice a month I allow myself to have whatever i want (within reason). For me this works!


(Ellenor Bjornsdottir (spare me thy resistant starch spiel)) #13

Physically, it’s correct to say that it won’t hurt. But it will cause a spiral into an addictive case.


#14

This is the ‘rub’. This is the the friction point. The more we rub it the more likely it becomes sore. But it’s itchy. Let’s talk about it with scratchy writing.

I don’t think intentional cruelty is at play here.

This discussion point of the psychology of eating, and the wide variation in the spectrum of responses and coping, is nuanced.

The neurophysiology of addiction plays a role. We see ‘food scientists’ manipulate us not for the good of our nutrition, but for the profits of industrial food producers. And in our n=1 responses to those addiction experiments, we can see that we are not immune to the manipulations.

I think it can be equally as destructive, and here I Nestlé down on the fence, to hint to addicts that a small dose of their presumed peccadillo (their hit) with destructive consequences is inconsequential. Or, equally, to adamantly dictate that abstinence is best. Abstinence in theory may well be best, but it creates a looming void when the expectation cannot be constantly achieved.

Meanwhile, as we discuss, debate, and eat, and be human we stumble along in our imperfection. Falling down, getting up, dusting off the crumbs and icing sugar. Then keeping calm and enjoying a wholefoods keto reset and a lesson learned. :slightly_smiling_face:

Maybe we should ride ponies? Repeated falling from a high horse (or tall wagon) can break one’s healthy living resolve.


#15

Cool. If it suits you and you feel great, why not cause it is what you require. But remember one thing, the DAY it all changes for you, be smart and act fast. Cause alot of times when we get very comfortable it can all backfire fast for some of us, so just keep your eyes open and wish you continued luck!!


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #16

First, let me state clearly that I don’t care (nor give a damn) what anyone else eats or doesn’t nor why they do or don’t. If it works for you who am I to gainsay? What I do care about, however, is confusing newbies.

Fact: a lot of stuff happens when one begins to eat keto. For weeks or months a newbie can experience conflicting experiences that can be both disconcerting and even scary. We all know this because we did.

Judging from many commentaries submitted by newbies to this forum, generally they are confused about keto and have unrealistic expectations. They don’t understand ketosis, they don’t understand ketones, they don’t understand fat adaptation, they don’t understand the difference between calorie restriction and hormonal theory. Especially, they don’t understand the importance of carbohydrate restriction while eating sufficient fat and protein to avoid metabolic retardation. It’s very hard to step past the CICO mindset which is pretty much where everyone starts.

I think those of us who have been keto for significant periods of time should always remain aware that for newbies we need to stay on focus. Newbies need to remain in ketosis consistently for months in order to become fully fat adapted. We need to say so and not equivocate. We should reinforce the message that consuming low carbs, the lower the better, is the most effective way to remain consistently in ketosis and to become efficiently fat adapted.

Now I have no objection to personal, n=1 experimentation and reportage of results. I do a lot of that myself. However, I think we ought not to present such to newbies if in doing so we confuse them into thinking that what works for someone who has been fat adapted for years is applicable for someone who is not yet efficiently fat adapted and in fact may prevent them becoming so.

To wit. If you can eat 100+ grams of carbs and remain in ketosis (really? do you measure?), telling newbies is not helping them because they probably can not. They’re looking for excuses to eat carbs and you gave them one. If you don’t count carbs and claim to remain consistently in ketosis (do you measure?) you’re just giving newbies an excuse for wishful thinking.

What I’m asking is: please don’t give newbies an excuse to eat more carbs. Instead, reinforce the necessity to remain consistently in ketosis and keep carbs low enough to do so.


#17

Like I said before, if you find my experience offensive and misleading and cruel, please report it so it can be removed. I will go elsewhere. I’m not sure why I’m being lectured on being misleading and cruel to newbies. I think I will just remove myself from the forums. I was mistaken in thinking everyone’s experiences welcome to talk about.
To those who wished me well, thank you.


#18

Offensive? No. Misleading? Possibly in the context of readers who are confused newbies, or carbohydrate/sugar addicts. Cruel? In my opinion, no.

I think your experience is enlightening and worthy of discussion as we’re doing. Hang around and keep posting. I think also that the commenters taking a precautionary point of view, may appreciate acknowledgement of their points. But that is up to you.

Sharing what works for you is helpful in our learning. I remember when my carb addiction was strong, I wouldn’t have appreciated such a post. But these days, with hunger and cravings well controlled (except for coffee, which I recognise as a true drug addiction), I appreciate from where you are posting.

I love this. Firstly, that the chocolate bar seems to be immortally edible. Secondly, that you remember its general location. Not exactly where it is, but that it is there somewhere. I always ate those chocolate bars, or I have forgotten about where they are. The fact that you use it as a memory relic of bygone eating, and that it has more value as that than a chocolate ‘hit’ is fascinating. Not lame at all. :slight_smile:


#19

Basically, do what you want but don’t talk about it here. Confusing newbies and giving them excuses. Seems pretty clear.


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #20

@Abi34 The title of this topic - not the ‘Dirty Lazy Keto’ part (that offends me and I’m nearly 4 years in) - but the ‘getting off the horse on purpose’ part. I think that’s confusing to newbies. Hypothetical newbie has just ‘given up’ some carb-loaded foods, thinks he or she has made some monumental ‘sacrifice’ doing so, and you’re saying it’s OK to eat it once in a while. That’s your opinion and you’re welcome to it and to express it.

All I’m saying is, you need to keep in mind that this forum is frequented by lots of folks who are newbies, know doodly squat and have limited experience. Those of us who have more experience just need to exercise restraint in how we express ourselves and/or report personal experiences. So, no, it’s not ‘do what you want but dont’ talk about it here’. Just keep in mind that some folks aren’t on the same wave length. No, it’s not fair to us, but life is not fair.

PS: not only you, but others as well. It’s just that this particular topic finally pushed me to say so. Don’t take it personally.