Bicycle Recommendations


(Ethan) #1

I’m a newbie and not interested in competing. I haven’t biked in over 25 years–and even then I was a noice. My son will be learning how to bike, and I plan to bike with him around the neighborhood. I am currently deciding between these bikes and need advice:

Option 1: Infinity Boss Three $170 at Costco:
http://infinitycycleworks.com/product/boss-three-mens-7-speed/
I would have to buy my own gear for it

Option 2: Fuji Crosstown 2.3 2018 $330:
https://www.performancebike.com/shop/bikes-frames/path-pavement-bikes/street-hybrid-bikes-400321/fuji-crosstown-23-comfort-bike-2018-31-8577
I would get 10% back to buy gear and a tune up after 1 year free

Option 3: Fuji Crosstown 2.3 2018 $250:
https://www.performancebike.com/shop/bikes-frames/path-pavement-bikes/street-hybrid-bikes-400321/fuji-crosstown-23-comfort-bike-2017-31-6186
I would get 10% back to buy gear and a tune up after 1 year free

Option 4: Fuji Crosstown 1.3 2017 $450:
https://www.performancebike.com/shop/bikes-frames/path-pavement-bikes/street-hybrid-bikes-400321/fuji-crosstown-13-comfort-bike-2017-31-6182
I would get 10% back to buy gear and a tune up after 1 year free

Option 5: Fuji Crosstown 2.1 2018 $450:
https://www.performancebike.com/shop/bikes-frames/path-pavement-bikes/street-hybrid-bikes-400321/fuji-crosstown-21-comfort-bike-2018-31-8575
I would get 10% back to buy gear and a tune up after 1 year free

Option 6 Fuji Crosstown 1.3 2018 $500:
https://www.performancebike.com/shop/bikes-frames/path-pavement-bikes/street-hybrid-bikes-400321/fuji-crosstown-13-disc-comfort-bike-2018-31-8573
I would get 10% back to buy gear and a tune up after 1 year free


(Scott O) #2

I would suggest checking FB Marketplace for a cheap used Hybrid. Then search YouTube for “Walmart hybrid”. The videos will really give you a good idea why you should or shouldn’t buy a more expensive bike. If the bike is going to sit in your garage, then there’s no reason to spend a lot.

Another option is to check with your friends and see what they ride. Then make it into social move. An old high school friend and I ride together a few times a week. We call each other using BlueTooth w/ noise cancelling mic. It’s the perfect time to talk about life.


(Ethan) #3

I agree that a big purchase sitting in the garage is a waste. I do plan on going out weekly with my son potentially. That’s kind of why I think the $400+ bikes in that list are not worth it. However, between $170 and $280 is about whether the price is worth it to me. Will I regret buying the cheaper one? There are a million reviews out there everywhere anyway, and the Walmart hybrid is in the same price range as these I think. I don’t have any friends who ride bikes in the same way that I would. Social moves imply time to hang out with friends, which I just don’t have lol.


#4

If your son is 3 and literally just learning to ride a bike then you won’t ever go far so I’d go cheap but if he’s 18 and will be traveling miles then a better lighter weight bike would be best. Also one where the wheels snap off for easier transportation if you want to drive to a trail somewhere. If going distances also be sure to get a seat based on your sit bone measurements as riding 30 km on a poorly sized seat hurts…a lot! But again, if he’s just a little kid then just get a cheap bike incase you decide there was a reason you haven’t riden in 25 years lol.


(Ethan) #5

He is 6. The bike i am asking about is for me, though. I have his all picked out! Our area has sidewalks on all streets. There is extensive bike pathing (fully paved) along a lot of the roads. In some cases, there is a separate bike path from the road and from the sidewalk.


#6

I would eliminate all of the bikes that have suspension forks.

I’m a mountain biker and know from experience that cheap suspension forks don’t really offer much in the way of shock absorption. These cheap suspension forks weigh a lot more and are not much better than a rigid fork. That eliminates #4, #5, and #6.

Beyond that, see if you can ride each of the first three and then decide based on which one feels the best to you.


(Ethan) #7

Wow so that eliminates the expensive ones more. The sales guy was trying at one point to sell me on the idea of the bikes being able to disengage the suspension. Since we will mostly be riding on road conditions, is suspension really a big deal to worry about?


#8

Okey doke. Yup. I realize it’s for you so since he’s just a young tyke, personally I’d go cheap. You really won’t be on it for any real length of time or distance. Also you won’t be traveling anywhere with the bikes so ease of take apart isn’t in question. Once you’re past this summer you will know or at least have a better idea if biking is something that you might want to get into for yourself such as for exercise, group rides/community, distance, mountain biking, an opportunity to be out on your own and contemplate whatever…lots of reasons for riding. Anyway, you can then always get something better and more specific to your then current needs. Honestly, for right now, I’d hit up a yard sale and give someone 10 bucks for the bike they bought with good intentions of exercising and then left sitting in the garage all year. LOL. You don’t need a Porsche (or the expenses that come with it) unless you have the road to drive it on. :wink:


(Ethan) #9

I don’t know much about what size I’ll need. The Fuji bikes will at least have some kind of professional sizing. The Infinity bike only comes in a single size that fits all (supposedly). A rando bike from a person on the street kinda scares me.


(Duncan Kerridge) #10

What Shallimar said, get a cheap second hand bike. If you fall in love with cycling go spend some money.


#11

Yes, some - or even most - suspension forks have a lock out mechanism which essentially turns it into a rigid fork. Usually this is done by turning a knob or level on top of the one of the fork stanchions - it’s usually on the right side, which is where the damping mechanism resides.

I don’t see any point in getting a bike with a suspension fork if you plan on doing most of your riding on the road. A suspension fork will just add more weight and will also increase your maintenance costs. Keep it as simple as possible.

I should note that, as a mountain biker, I’m a big fan of suspension forks. But I also know that you have to be willing to spend a bit of money to get a good one.

I’ll also note that I’ve ridden (on rough trails) with guys riding fully rigid bikes. Some of them were quite fast and had no trouble negotiating the bumpy parts of the trail.


#12

I bought us all bikes some years ago when the kids were younger. 100 bucks a piece at canadian tire. I rode mine a half dozen times. Put it in the shed. Sold it three years later for 15 bucks on FB. Still had the nibs on the tires lol. Take it for a spin at the yard sale. If the wheels turn and the brakes work and the tires hold air you’re good. JMHO but as I said, you’re not riding far and wide with a 6 year old.


(Tom Seest) #13

I would focus less on the specific bicycle, and focus more on the seat…If you aren’t comfortable riding, you won’t ride. Nothing beats a great bicycle seat and some good bicycle shorts with padding. Enjoy the ride…


(Rob) #14

Depending on where you live, Craigslist is a good source of high quality, good priced bikes. I have bought all but 1 of my bikes (I have 4) off CL. They are all mid-range road bikes (Cannondale CAAD 8, CAAD 10 and an older Giant TCR1 carbon fiber bike) costing from $280-700. As I got more into cycling, I got more expensive bikes… and more Lycra :flushed:

The other one I got as a close-out sale at a sporting goods store going bust. It was my only bike for a few years. It is a Jamis Coda steel frame (631) road hybrid and I’ve put a few thousand miles on it with nothing but a couple of tune ups and new ‘puncture proof’ tires - well worth it for urban riding. It cost $250 at the time and is nice enough and strong enough to be an everyday commuter bike but is fun and light enough to do moderate leisure rides (30+ miles) up and down hills. If you go too cheap, you will have a heavy lump with bad components that will fail quickly and be no fun. It is amazing how a 10lbs lighter bike is much less effort to pedal up a hill.

I quite like Fuji’s (a friend has one) but I wouldn’t buy new.


(Chris W) #15

FWIW I looked at option 1 and its an Ok bike. Its light,

I just bought one of these at my local costco I have put a few miles on it, its a great cruiser and rides nice. I would agree with tom you need to get a good seat and maybe grips. Its made by giant and has decent parts on it, not the lightest bike but its light for a fat tire and fun to ride very stable. I am a mountain biker I got this one to run my dog on it was $299.

https://www.costco.com/Northrock-XC00-Fat-Tire-Mountain-Bike.product.100395393.html


(Mark) #16

Look for a used Electra townie they make men’s and women’s versions,with flat foot technology,which means you can sit on the bike with your feat flat on the floor,great cruiser bikes


(Ethan) #17

I have zero trust in Craigslist to go find a bike. It takes a lot of time to go and take a look, and I just don’t trust people about their bikes they are trying to sell or my ability to figure that out. I doubt I will ever get too enthusiastic about it. I can’t wear lycra!


(Troy) #18

Nice😄
I’m riding a CAAD 12
Love it


(Troy) #19

@EZB …if you decide on Going w performancebikes…they do have really good sales
Typically, you can get 20% back ( performance club member ) on their periodic sales…including bikes😄

If I remember correctly, they have a 30% back to PCM…either once or twice a year
I would have to dig for the info or previous emails though🤔

Found it!
30% back on ALL bikes ran last year …8-27 ~ 9-1​:smile::smile:


(Ethan) #20

Right…that sounds like the time they would want to run a sale…right AFTER the high season. The amount back that I see now is just 10% off future purchase.