Scandinavia, especially Sweden


#1

I’m wondering …

  1. are there other people from Scandinavia, and especially Sweden, on these forums? I would like to connect with someone who has experience dealing with Ketogenic diets under the Swedish medical system.

  2. does anyone know of a keto-sympathetic doctor in the Stockholm area. Or better yet a keto-friendly, metabolic approach-friendly oncologist in the Stockholm area?


(Raj Seth) #2

Dietdoctor.com. Swedish keto extraordinaire


(Jessika Nilsson) #3

Hi,
I’m Swedish and ketogenic, but I don’t have very much experience combining it with the Swedish medical system though… But from my small experience is that some doctor’s are OK with it, and others are not… But none of them will force you to quit keto, they might just not be too happy about it :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

No clue regarding question number 2, as I live in the southern parts for the country, and even then I wouldn’t now one :see_no_evil:


(So much bacon . . . so little time . . .) #4

My understanding, from things Andreas Eenfeldt has said in lectures, is that Sweden discarded the U.S. dietary guidelines and now officially encourages a ketogenic way of eating. Dr. Eenfeldt said in one lecture that, as a result, Sweden was experiencing a butter shortage (this was a few years ago), and people were smuggling it into the country!


(Jessika Nilsson) #5

They don’t officially encourage keto or LCHF, but they don’t either discourage it anymore since they did the review and did not uncover any bad side effects of keto. (A doctor who was recommending LCHF was reported and they had to do a big review to check whether she was doing something wrong or not)

But I would say that the trend is that more and more people are focusing on eating real food and therefore people are using more butter than margarine now. The butter shortages are usually due to both increased demand at the same time as our dairy production has gone down, and we’re kind of really picky about the butter coming from Sweden :wink:


#6

This year the Swedish butter scarcity will probably get worse because the hot dry summer reduced the hay production so much that many dairy farmers feared for the survival over winter and some started to cull their herds. Butter prices are certainly going up. It’s still available now (nov 2018)


(So much bacon . . . so little time . . .) #7

We’ll have to arrange a butter airlift for you over the winter!


(Jessika Nilsson) #8

The prices have been going up since last year, due to increased demand and not enough supply. Not sure I’ve yet seen any rise where I live in Sweden, but butter is certainly more expensive than a couple of years ago…
Also, ‘Skånemejerier’ is generally cheaper than ‘Arla’, at least in Skåne, and tastes just as good :wink:


(Bob M) #9

Your Vasterbotten cheese is particularly awesome. (I’m not sure how to get the double dots above the “a”.)

I don’t think everyone in Sweden is suddenly following the LC lifestyle. I have four people coming to stay from Sweden and two of the four are vegetarian.


#10

Yes @ctviggen, vegetarianism is being pushed hard as a response to climate change. And vegans are numerous. But there has also been a considerable interest in paleo diets, and on a broader front 5-2 approaches to eating is well known, and practiced by many.

(The “ä” has ASCII Code 132. If you have a Windows OS and an English keyboard, you can get the letter “ä” by holding down the Alt key while typing the number 132. You can see the full ASCII code table at https://theasciicode.com.ar/)


(So much bacon . . . so little time . . .) #11

The agronomist Peter Ballerstedt has a lot to say about the harm crop-growing does to the environment. He also points out that ruminants are necessary for healthy grasslands, and that grasslands are not fit for crop-growing, so the ruminants are creating food from land that we couldn’t use in any other way.

I’m rather partial to the photo of a cow with the legend, “I’m a vegan so you don’t have to be.” :bacon:


#12

Ór įf yôū hávę ãn Åpplę, hôld dòwn thė kêÿ tîll yóü gēt æ pøp üp tø çhœōśê frôm.


(Bob M) #13

I totally agree with this. See this:

https://proteinpower.com/drmike/2017/07/02/low-carbohydrate-diet-and-climate-change/

Or Allan Savory:

But since the people coming are my wife’s sister, her husband, and kids, and the sister and her oldest daughter are vegetarian, and they are coming to celebrate the Christmas holiday, this isn’t an argument I’m going to address with them.


(Jessika Nilsson) #14

Västerbotten cheese is one of my favourites :smiley: But we have some other nice cheeses as well which are not as aged though. But we have a great selection of different cheeses if I might say so myself, especially as we have all of the fun ones from other European countries as well :yum:

And we might have a lot of low carbers/keto dieters in the country, but most remain with the ‘standard’ diet of carbs and limiting fat. There’s also different trends, with many going vegetarian or vegan, or going really protein heavy with whey shakes and protein puddings etc. There’s also a big trend of whole foods.
But LCHF/keto is pretty well known and accepted, even if it could definitely be more accepted than it is. But at least it’s been ok to recommend LCHF by doctor’s for a couple of years now :wink:


#15

Yes, I like Västerbotten cheese too. It’s one of those cheeses that bites back.

Jessika, can you tell me anything about Swedish goat milk and cheese?


(Jessika Nilsson) #16

Well, it’s pretty uncommon with Swedish made goat milk och cheese, but some of the minor producers have some, Dalspira for example. You might be able to find something in well-provided grocery stores. I do know we have goat milk & yoghurt at a ICA close to where I live.

And there’s lots of goat cheese as long as you don’t care whether it’s produces in Sweden or not.