Runner's World on Keto


#1

Not exactly science, but nice to see in a running magazine.


(John) #2

Seems odd for a running mag to not promote the largest benefits, you won’t bonk, you can run pretty much forever, and you don’t have to eat carb goo all the time and run off into the forest to find some leaves…


(Tim W) #4

Good points John,

As a distance runner who uses keto/IF/fasting to control weight/cravings/A1C etc. I can say that I much prefer running a marathon/longer with nothing but a bottle of water, if that…

Moving past the “consume lots of carbs and sugar if you want and then go run it off” club, my health has only gotten better, as my endurance has climbed. I am slower to start when running but my recovery is faster and I don’t have to buy/carry/deal with the gels and other crap, not to mention I don’t stress out over “carbing up” the week prior to a marathon etc.

I find it amusing to watch everyone at the start of a race, watching everyone checking their kit, making sure they have enough carbs to get them through the race, the total lack of a bonk when eating keto is the most valuable part about it, that and the fact that you are no longer metabolically damaging yourself with the insulin spikes and belly fat that comes from carb loading/de-loading.


(So much bacon . . . so little time . . .) #5

A little checking around would have told them that the keto flu and constipation are related to the increased salt and water excretion resulting from not ingesting carbohydrate and that they can be ameliorated, possibly even prevented, with an adequate intake of bone broth. And from what I’ve read on these forums and from remarks by doctors Attia, Volek, and Phinney, it seems that the performance hit is temporary and that performance goes back up again after you become fat-adapted. They could have done a bit more research.


#6

I have to agree with infromsea. I am not a runner, but a long distance hiker. I follow the keo lifestyle, and I hike with no food whatsoever, just water with electrolytes. I have done 20 hour day hikes as such with no issues. I also have to agree, that it takes me an hour or two to hit a good steady state in my hikes wrt energy levels and it continues on endlessly.


#7

Good to see you here!


(Tim W) #8

Thanks! Glad to be here, I love this board! And a hearty “welcome aboard” to you as well.


(KetoCowboy) #9

Love the passive construction of an undisputed fact here:

“With the lower insulin levels, it’s believed that the fatty acids are more readily released from the body’s fat tissue, freeing them up to be used for fuel,” he explains.

Most doctors would just say, “High insulin prevents fat metabolism,” but this fear mongering article about keto has to mince words to give the impression that “If you lower your insulin, SOME people believe ti MIGHT POSSIBLY impact your body’s ability to metabolize fat, but no one knows for sure, and pancakes are delicious with syrup.”


(So much bacon . . . so little time . . .) #10

Sort of like saying, “With jumping out the window of the 180th floor of the Empire State building, it is believed that there might be some deleterious effects.”


(Ethan De Freitas) #11

I would say that Keto is the ultimate runners dream. Theoritcally, you could run for as long as you wanted to. Since your fuel is fat, primarily fat you eat and then of course fat that’s on you. There’s an unprecedented amount of fuel just being carried with you. Just bring water bottle and you’re set.