Help Feeding a Toddler


(Jacob Wagner) #1

Some time ago my wife posted about feeding our baby.

Now I am trying to feed him as a toddler of 22 months.

I try to give him the foods we are eating, but he often refuses (and throws) them. Then I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to reward him throwing food by giving him something carby but I worry he won’t get enough to eat.

He isn’t talking well enough for me to find out what he wants. To complicate it more, he sometimes even throws things he likes if he is upset.

I end up giving him milk, sometimes fortified with cream, just to make sure he gets some calories.

Do you have any ideas for feeding a toddler?

–Jacob


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #2

You might get some helpful ideas from this site:


(Jacob Wagner) #3

Thanks.

I was actually reading that when you posted. It focuses a lot on older children, I’m not so sure it helps me much.

–Jacob


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #4

Gotcha! Try this for younger/infant. Skip the first part which discusses epilspsy and related keto treatments (or read for interest), and start here:

Ketogenic Diet for Children at Home

Besides keto being used for medical reasons in children, parents following the ketogenic diet wonder how they can get their kids on board with the food (and also help them learn to grow up making healthy choices) at home…


(Jacob Wagner) #5

Thanks I read that over. I will go back later and red some of the links to recipies.

–Jacob


(GINA ) #7

Whatever you decide to feed him, don’t make it a battle, don’t wheedle or cojole or beg him to eat. If his development is normal and he doesn’t have sensory or other issues, he will eat when he is hungry. I have never met a toddler that would starve himself.

Put him in a high chair, cut the food up into small pieces and put it on the tray. It is pretty tough to throw a pea-size bite of chicken. If he does start throwing food, tell him no and take it off the tray. Leave it where he can see it and calmly continue with your meal or cup of coffee or whatever. When he asks for it again, give it to him, but be ready to take it if he starts throwing it. Keep this up until meal time is over then put him down.

If he acts hungry later, do it all again, but maybe try a different (healthy and acceptable to you) food. You don’t have to keep giving him the same food ala Mommy Dearest.


#8

My grandkids were ones I would have anticipated to not eat Keto. However, hard boiled eggs has been their go-to favorite. From the time she was able to eat solids, my oldest granddaughter has devoured “boilin’ eggs”. Her younger brother followed in her footsteps. In one sitting, the two of them ate 9 hard boiled eggs. I was shocked. But, they are incredibly healthy and active, with no signs of obesity.

My suggestions would include presenting eggs (or any other meat or cheese) as the only option for one meal. But making them several different ways, so they think they are getting options.

I did chaffles, and those went over very well. But, you can morph that dough into pancakes, or breadsticks with garlic and parmesan.

The keto pizza is a fabulous one too. My kids claim they don’t eat keto, but whenever they scarf down that pizza, that’s what they got!

You also might just be dealing with that particular age group, that gets fussy around meal time. Or, the little guy might not be hungry enough to eat. After 5 kids, I’ve learned how different they all are. And, how their eating patterns fluctuate. When the youngest boy was a toddler, there were days he ate like moose, and days when he’d only want milk and nibble on part of a hot dog. When the growth spurts started happening, I was glad I raised layer chickens! Eggs, bacon, toast, OJ and milk. He ate 6 eggs, 4 pieces of toast, 4 glasses of OJ, and half a pound of bacon a few times when he was 7 and 8. Maybe put some different meat options out there, too. Cut up hot dogs, sausage patties, cheese, etc. I used cookie cutters to make shapes for the kids out of slices of cheese and turkey ham. They loved black olives, too. I accidentally discovered that my kids loved smoked salmon. (Its waaaayyy too expensive to buy regularly, but my hubby had received some as a holiday gift. Made the mistake of sharing it with the two middle kids. Good grief. They turned into monsters with that! )

If he starts throwing the food, I’d just remove the food from his reach, and wait until he is calm and decides he is hungry. If he doesn’t see any other food options, he will come around. I just hid or tossed out all the things I didn’t want them to have. After all, they can’t point and scream for foods if those foods aren’t there.

As for my youngest boy now…he is almost 23.
He’s 6’1", weighs 165-175… And, he eats mostly keto - without trying. He’d rather eat eggs, or a whole slab of lake trout for a meal - not with bread or potatoes. If he’s over here, he’ll eat green beans or broccoli as a side, but not the starches. He transitioned himself over just based on his own personal tastes. I peeked in his fridge recently…the top three items? Raw fish, eggs, and ketchup. No bread, no fries, no rice or potatoes.


(A fool and his bacon are soon parted) #9

Yeah, the kid doesn’t have to eat if he doesn’t want to. My mother, having grown up dirt poor in the Depression, had been trained never to pass up an opportunity to eat, because there might not be any more, any time soon. And what you put on your plate, you had to eat, wasting food was anathema. This attitude has pervaded our society, and being hungry all the time from eating carbs doesn’t help. It just encourages us to graze constantly and to feel that our children must eat, or they’ll starve.

The one thing I would ensure while feeding a child a ketogenic diet, is that the kid has enough protein available. The problem with the keto diet for epilepsy is that it was something like 95% fat, and lacked enough protein for proper growth, especially once the pubertal growth spurt started. But a child with access to enough protein should not experience this problem. (There is apparently an instinct for eating an appropriate amount of protein, so as long as it’s available, the kid can eat however much or little he wants.) Fortunately, there are now data to show that the fat content of the epileptic keto diet doesn’t need to be as high as originally thought, and a more appropriate protein content doesn’t have to interfere with seizure control.

What a gift, though, to bring up your kids without a taste for sweets, grains, and starches!


#10

I personally wouldn’t try to make my kid a keto kid unless they just seemed to take to it. At that age getting in nutrition is more important that putting non standard WOE on them. Easy enough to get them foods that taste good to them but aren’t terrible for them either. My kid is 6 now and I’m just now starting to slowly tweak how he eats, his bread is now the low carb bread that I eat, the jelly in his PB&J is the sugar free one. His popsicles and ice creams are the low carb / no sugar added ones. His sugar/junk carb intake is probably less than half most kids, that’s enough. He’s in school and I can’t control 100% of what he eats and won’t be able to for many years. Don’t want to create a situation where when he eats at school or just eats “normal” food he gets sick because his body is a strict keto only body. Look how much is screws with adults when they do it and never eat anything “normal”. As he gets older and able to understand more I’ll teach him more and hopefully it takes. All you can do.


#11

Blockquote
This. Both my parents were kids during the depression. My Dad was 7 and Mom was 3 1/2 when it hit. That whole “clean your plate” thing was real in our house growing up. (My Mom, unfortunately, fell for that “egg yolks and butter are bad for you” BS, and we ended up with egg whites and margerine for a good part of my childhood.) Prior to the Depression in the early 1900’s, my one Gran was dirt poor as a child in Detroit. They used to have “pretend chicken sandwiches”. These consisted of bread, mayo or butter, salt and pepper. That was it. You’d just pretend there was chicken tucked in there somewhere, and be happy with what you got.
Amazing that I eat the way I do now!


#12

Apparently, my block quote from PaulL. did not work out so good. We try again…

“My mother, having grown up dirt poor in the Depression, had been trained never to pass up an opportunity to eat, because there might not be any more, any time soon. And what you put on your plate, you had to eat, wasting food was anathema. This attitude has pervaded our society, and being hungry all the time from eating carbs doesn’t help. It just encourages us to graze constantly and to feel that our children must eat, or they’ll starve.”

This. Both my parents were kids during the depression. My Dad was 7 and Mom was 3 1/2 when it hit. That whole “clean your plate” thing was real in our house growing up. (My Mom, unfortunately, fell for that “egg yolks and butter are bad for you” BS, and we ended up with egg whites and margerine for a good part of my childhood.) Prior to the Depression in the early 1900’s, my one Gran was dirt poor as a child in Detroit. They used to have “pretend chicken sandwiches”. These consisted of bread, mayo or butter, salt and pepper. That was it. You’d just pretend there was chicken tucked in there somewhere, and be happy with what you got.
Amazing that I eat the way I do now!

I really suck at this quoting stuff. Copy and paste is more my speed… :upside_down_face:


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #13

@SecondBreakfast Simply highlight the material you wish to quote. When you hit Reply it is automagically inserted into your post correctly formatted.


#14

I would not put a toddler on any kind of diet. But I would perhaps limit the sugars. Like not so much candy and ice cream or cake and cookies- opting for berries and fruit instead. If you give a fat-heavy diet plus carbs ( as in bread or potatoes or rice or fruit) thats trouble brewing. That IS the stuff high cholesterol is made of as well as obesity. But I would not start my kids life on a diet. There is enough time to diet later in life, if they even have to and even chose to. None of us would be eating keto if we felt good. When I was young I was slim, I did IF without knowing what it was, and I simply watched my figure because I wanted to date! At that time I would never have considered keto as a way of life, and even today some times it is hard and I dream of coffee ice cream or chocolate.
And as for throwing food- that I would forbid! Food really does need to be treated with respect. Honestly- when one really does consider all the people who are starving on this planet? Maybe lead by example. Praise when good and reprimand when not. Take the food out of his or her hands and feed him/her until s/he understands that food is something holy.


(A fool and his bacon are soon parted) #15

I love how unlimited Coca-Cola and potato chips is fine for kids, but meat and leafy greens are weird foods to feed them. So much of the stuff now considered normal food didn’t exist sixty years ago, when I was a kid. But that stuff is “normal,” and keto is a “diet.” Wow!