Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine


(Jane Srygley) #101

That is a really great point! HCQ is dangerous for the heart and so is COVID-19, so it does seem like the combination could potentially do more harm than good.

I think keto is the best weapon against the immunological insanity of COVID myself. That and wearing masks and social distancing, of course.

I don’t know if anyone has posted this article into this thread/topic yet, but I found it really interesting:

“Analyses of lung fluid cells from COVID-19 patients conducted on the nation’s fastest supercomputer point to gene expression patterns that may explain the runaway symptoms produced by the body’s response to SARS-CoV-2.”


(bulkbiker) #102

In overzealous doses?

It has also been on the safe list for what 65 years without causing too many issues?


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #103

Please note that I am not making any accusations about Fauci or his interests in Gilead Sciences. Just find it very interesting that the one and only study used to justify the use of Remdesivir seems to have been misrepresented. The data actually supports the use of hydroxychloroquine instead.

Summary:

  • The use of Remdesivir for COVID-19 was authorized by the FDA based on a single RCT, conducted by NIAID with the participation of Gilead Sciences, the exclusive manufacturer of Remdesivir. A final report from this study was published on October 8, five months after the drug’s authorization.

  • The final report shows that at least 35% of the patients were treated with Hydroxychloroquine, probably with Azithromycin. The data in the final report suggests that Hydroxychloroquine, not Remdesivir, was the main factor benefitting the patients in this study.

  • Nothing in the study supports the hypothesis that Remdesivir is an effective antiviral for SARS-COV-2.

  • The study’s own numbers show an association between RDV and increased mortality in the most severe patients. It is also possible to conclude that RDV is net harmful for most hospitalized patients.

  • The trial was conducted and reported with multiple defects, including:

  • The study was not double blind, but was reported as such
  • The pre-registered protocol was changed multiple times over the course of the trial
  • The primary outcome was changed in the middle of the trial, apparently because the researchers noticed a lack of effectiveness of their drug as tried
  • The outcome measures were subjective and not reliable
  • The study was marred with conflicts of interest, aggravated by the design giving NIAID and Gilead everage over the hospitals and physicians treating patients
  • At least three of the study researchers-authors failed to report grants and/or personal fees received from Gilead recently.

Here’s the actual study if you want to assess the above analysis.

PS: Please don’t argue with me, I’m just the reporter.


(Polly) #104

Thanks for the links @amwassil


(Peter) #105

The messenger, anyway.


(Elmo) #106

Yes, but for ‘Leo Goldstein’? :smile: Not his real name, I think, and - serious question here - why would anybody believe what ‘he’ says? It’s a mixture of deliberately deceptive stuff, cherry-picked things, and outright lies.

“The use of Remdesivir for COVID-19 was authorized by the FDA based on a single RCT, conducted by NIAID with the participation of Gilead Sciences, the exclusive manufacturer of Remdesivir. A final report from this study was published on October 8, five months after the drug’s authorization.”

No, that’s a lie right there. Again, why in the world would anybody believe this, with only the claim from ‘Leo Goldstein’? It’s not true.

The change in October is full approval from the FDA for treatment of hospitalized patients 12 years old and older, and weighing 40 kg (88 lbs.) or more. There had been an Emergency Use Authorization in place for the drug (since May 1, I believe). The EUA has now been amended to allow for continued use, at this time, for hospitalized patients under 12 years old and/or weighing at least 3.5 kg (7.7 lbs.).

Nothing much has changed over the last couple months. When looking at all valid RCT studies, there still is no “miracle cure.” Nothing helps everybody, nor is there any guarantee for a given patient, ahead of time. Hydroxychloroquine does, on average, have a decent chance of making Covid-19 symptoms go away faster than with no drug at all. It’s not demonstrably better, in that respect, than the other drugs, however, and it does present more risk of harmful effects on patients.

In looking at peer-reviewed studies in the aggregate, hydroxychloroquine has improved in status - that red rectangle is now yellow, i.e. not substantially different from ‘standard care’ (none of the drugs in question being used). It remains much more likely to bring about adverse events for patients, however, versus Remdesivir, over 5 times more likely.


(Michael - When reality fails to meet expectations, the problem is not reality.) #107



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