Supplements claiming to burn carbs from body


(christina d kornhauser) #1

I am seeing supplement products at pharmacies that claim to reduce carbs in the body. Is there any truth to these claims?


(Jennibc) #2

I don’t think so. Supplements aren’t regulated by the FDA so they put anything they want on their labels to make a sale. I also don’t always trust how safe those things are. If you want to reduce carbs in your body, the only sure fire way of doing that is to not put them in your mouth.


(Jennibc) #3

This story right here is why I don’t use supplements https://www.bbc.com/news/stories-45971416


(Old Baconian) #4

I would say, probably not. The easiest way to reduce the amount of carbohydrate in your body is not to eat any—much cheaper than any supplement!

Seriously, though, there is no need for carbohydrate in the diet, because the body can make all the glucose it needs, and it only needs to have about a U.S. tablespoon’s worth of glucose circulating in the bloodstream at any time (that’s about 15 grams’ worth). Certain cells lack mitochondria (the red blood cells, in particular), and so need to be supplied with glucose, but the rest of the body is just fine metabolising ketone bodies and fatty acids for energy.


(christina d kornhauser) #5

agreed. just curious if anyone in keto is familiar. thanks.


(Karim Wassef) #6

Do you have examples?

It is possible to cook starches in a way that makes them less digestible - basically trapping them in fiber as resistant starches. Or not cooking at all - like eating raw potatoes (not advocating, just sharing).

They basically pass undigested or go through fermentation which produces fatty acids from the carbs. But that takes time, chemistry and biology… I don’t see a supplement doing any of that.


(Scott) #7

This makes me think back to the 1970’s when gas was rationed. All kinds of products came out to boost your gas mileage. I can remember someone saying that if they all worked as advertised a driver would need to stop every few miles and empty the surplus gas out of the tank.

A supplement that magicly burns fat or carbs makes my BS radar go bing.


#8

You mean not digest them. Disgusting college students on spring break have demonstrated on an annual basis that there’s more than one way to get drunk. And that’s all I’m gonna say about that.


(Old Baconian) #9

Aieeee!!! You have got to be fucking kidding. That’s disgusting, not to mention dangerous! :scream:


#10

Yes, apparently, it bypasses the liver’s filtering and metabolic processes so that the ethanol goes straight into your veins for an immediate and intense buzz. So sayeth Google, anyway. Female coeds have, um, used other, um, methods of absorption not available to their male counterparts.

All I can say is thank fire I made it out of college in the early 90s with nothing but a few hazy memories of brightly-colored punch and spinning rooms. The only pains in the ass I sustained were from listening to student electrical engineers drone on and on during dates.


(Marion) #11

Wow, that is horrendous!
I’ve just stopped taking my (expensive) supposedly fabulous fish oil supplements cause I read a study on them that listed different brands and clarified the amount of oxidation they found in each…scary.


#12

I always wished a magic pill existed.
It doesn’t and won’t ever. I accepted just that LOL


#13

Oh they absolutely exist! But they’re not for most people aside from biohackers, people that don’t mind taking things they’re not prescribed, and people that are a little nuts (I’m a lot) and the super “magical” ones are kinda dangerous. I’ve pretty much used them all, but I wouldn’t recommend half the crap I do to “normal” people. I’m kinda out there!


#14

Buy GMP/IFOS certified ones. Carlsons, Nordic Naturals, even Sports Research which is pretty affordable and is IFOS certified. No need to not take something good just because some halfass it.