New Category Suggestion: Exercise > Backpacking


(Mark Lewis) #1

I am a backpacking/hammock camping enthusiast (everything from day hikes, overnights, weekends, and long distance). I am currently doing research on how to backpack and eat keto. I would love to have somewhere to share the info I am gathering and what I learn in the field.


(Wayne Godfrey) #2

I agree. My wife and I have recently graduated from day hikes to backpacking. We’re finding it hard to eat LCHF while in the backcountry - particularly if it’s more than one night.


#3

I was thinking of making some pemican this summer and trying that out. I’m unsure what to eat for LCHF meals for an extended backpacking trip.


#4

My family of five usually hikes with a couple other similar families for four day hikes each summer - one conflicts with ketofest this year :frowning: Those hikes are one of the tiny steps that I have taken to going keto before I actually did commit to the keto way of eating. I was close to keto on those hikes and always felt great without the bread or milk.

Basically, I eat a lot of meat, particularly steak, but also lamb and chicken. We freeze it, some very cold and wrapped, some less cold but still frozen and some just chilled. We go raw and cook it there, but you could pre-cook it (sous vide) then freeze it and then just heat it up on the trail with a fire or a mini cook stove.

For twenty some years, we brought eggs in those plastic containers. Last year, we brought liquid eggs in cartons (frozen to start the hike) primarily because my egg count is getting high and the eggs in shells are voluminous.

Bacon, sausages and cheese are great. Butter (again, start frozen) can be added to soup mixes and about anything else.


(Thomi M) #5

Now that I am healthy I am getting back into backpacking, too. Spending the summer getting strong and aquiring gear, then aiming to do a 288 mile thru hike in central NY after my kids start up school. I will have boxes of food made up for weekly resupply that my hubby can mail to me - local post offices will hold mail marked for a thru hiker.
So far I have made pemmican, which is kinda a process but not hard. Tastes decent, but I want to try adding nuts and trace amounts of dried fruit. I found I can make @richard 's polenta recipe, sans cream cheese, in a heavy zipper bag. I put everything in, including crushed broth cubes and seasoning, then add boiling water at the campsite. I haven’t pushed the refrigeration of the parmesan too long yet, but a week seems reasonable. Other things to bring are nuts, blocks of cheese, whole salami and pepperonis, butter and coconut oil.

I would love to hear other ideas!


(A Very Hungry Bunny) #6

Can we also add HiiT/Strength Training/Crossfit??


(eat more) #7

to me those are all forms of weight lifting (and sometimes cardio lol)…not “power lifting” but for sure resistance/strength training :blush:


(Bryan Ausinheiler) #9

My parmesan lasted 1mo on the AT. Boxed shipped farther ahead than that had a little mold that required cutting. :slight_smile:


(Bryan Ausinheiler) #10

I ran into exactly the same problem of figuring out how to eat keto while backpacking. Most ketogenic cookbooks rely heavily on fresh ingredients like meats, zuchinni etc or cooking methods not available in the back country oven, blender etc. A lot of typical backpacking fare is either all carbs (ramen), or too high in protein (jerky)

After failing to find much guidance I set about experimenting with recipes and published a book on amazon called ketogenic backpacking book with 52 recipes that I tested during a 2 month, 707 section of the Appalachian Trail. I think the key to ketogenic backpacking food is finding ways to add healthy shelf- stable fats to each meal. This could be as simple as adding butter to tea or as complex as a miso, seaweed and mushroom soup with avocado oil or home-made pemmican.

One of the easiest and most delicious keto backpacking foods I eat is almond butter butter. I take a 1lb jar of almond butter and pour half into another empty jar of the same size. Then I add 8oz of soft grass fed butter to each stir incorporate. Dangerously delicious