🇬🇧 New UK forum Category 🇬🇧


#40

Thank you.

I’m.wondering if it’s possible for us Londoners and nearbys to do a bulk buy of expensive ingredients…


(Bella) #41

Hi Pat,
I was researching where to buy grass-fed beef without it coasting an arm and a leg. There are quite a few based in London but not sure how legitimate they are.

After watching The Magic Pill - there is no way I can find the space for a whole cow.
:cow:


#42

Maybe a tenth of a small fatty cow. How big is a cow?

I suppose it could be possible at the end of the summer before the likelihood of it not eating grass.


#43

‘Waves from Aberdeen ways”
If your wanting to buy beef in bulk try. Green pasture farms. They do cow, lamb and pig as cow share, you can buy a whole and have it delivered all at once or they can split up the delivery’s so you get part now and the rest delivered at separate times. Cow I think they do by whole, 1/2 or 1/10, lamb is I think whole or half (looks like there out of stock at the moment, ) piggy’s is whole or half. And you can get tail, ears etc… :smiley:

I’ve ordered from them before (misc stuff plus a whole pig) and was really happy with the service and product (and no I don’t work for them or anything)


(Bella) #44

WOW, I was kind of joking about a whole cow, now I see the possibilities, especially if I get the family to chip in.
Thanks


(Heidi Cuthbertson (Standen) ) #45

I’ve ordered from them before and brought loads of suet, chicken skins, pork back-fat and rinds and marrow bones. Only wish the marrow bones where bigger and not sliced into discs, but they were still tasty. Maybe we should all chip in and buy a cow?


#46

Thank you.
And maybe a visit to Billingsgate…


(Norma Laming) #48

Hi all I’m Norma, a Londoner who’s been living in Ipswich for nearly 10years. I’m lucky that my local butcher has usually seen the beef on the hoof before slaughter and knows what they’re eating.

But these people are also good: Ford Hall Farm though I found their streaky bacon too salty for me. I know of other good places for meat by post, if anyone’s interested


(Allie) #49

I’ve been looking at this site… https://www.buyacow.uk


#50

I’m wondering if the companies that provide online cows, so to speak, maybe over butcher from a keto point of view and remove most of the fat. And the organ meat often has to be added as an extra.

So I’m going to enquire of local butchers and I’m hoping the costs will be lower especially if the butchered cow can be collected and not delivered.


(Norma Laming) #51

You ask them for what you want! I’ve never come across a butcher who wasn’t happy not to trim off fat


#52

I phoned a butcher in Lincolnshire where my mum gets her meat. This is what he said:

Cow - Lincolnshire Red, a native bread (75% native), higher fat, slightly smaller, late maturing, completely grass fed
Weight of one side - half a cow is 150kg or 330lb
Cost £750 or £5 per kg; beef prices are stable and unlikely to change
There are three qualities of meat in a cow:
top and silverside - 30%
rump, sirloin, fillet, ribeye - 30%
brisket - 40%
And any of these can be cut into different products eg mince or stewing beef, steaks or roasting joints.

He would need to know the numbers of people and how each person wants their proportion cut.


(Bella) #53

Now this guy ( he can be a bit extreme) is claiming that if a cow eats just one blade of grass in its lifetime then the producer can label it as grass-fed.
:weary:


(Allie) #54

Wouldn’t surprise me when you consider some of the other stupidities that qualify as laws here…


(Jack Brien) #55


Bought myself a ribeye this afternoon.


(Vijay Bhakta) #56

Ok…taking the cow thing a bit too far…


(Allie) #57

Ummmm… what?! :thinking:


(Doug) #58

(mags) #59

Brits for you :grinning:


#60

In the UK there are three distinct types. Traditional scratchings are made from shank rind and cooked just once. Pork crackling is also made from shoulder rind, but is fried twice. It is first rendered at a low heat, and then cooked at a higher temperature for a less fatty, crispier result, or cut from roasted pork joints to produce heavier but less fatty results. A more recent development is the pork crunch, which is made from back rind and again double-fried to become a large, puffy snack.[28] Some supermarkets now sell just the layer of skin and fat (no meat), in a raw form for home grilling or roasting, or cooked and ready to eat from hot food counters. The term “crackling” is also often applied to a twice-cooked variety of pork scratchings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_rind